what would meek do genius

what would meek do genius
November 1, 2020

So what is ‘over there’ that Keef wishes to point out? On Thursday, the rapper posted …, Dr. Dre's divorce is taking a new twist. And the shamelessness continues on obvious Ski Mask the Slump God-bite “Off White,” which demonstrates how Pump has relegated his lexicon to brand recognition (“white rice / Fortnite / pew, pew, pew, pew”) and “Vroom Vroom Vroom,” which furthers a lyrical de-evolution (though less humorously). Mailloux Matt McCracken Chris Mello Ryo Miyauchi Evan Morgan Brendan Nagle Calum Reed Sam Thomas-Redfern Elliot Rieth Steven Warner Morris Yang, Staff | Contact | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram, building a Slim Shady-esque mythos that (according to him) the world can’t help but imitate. On that point, one can only wonder why the track “Name in the Sand” — a truly fascinating, fractured take on R&B-rap — was left for the end of the record. The first seven tracks on, highlight this problem to an almost numbing degree, as Gunna’s only real vocal quirk — slurring his words enough that it could, Tong Li sample on “Who You Foolin”) doesn’t help matters either. This is for the sole purpose of entertainment; no profit is gained from this. Music imprint. SoundCloud junkies Paul Attard and Joe Biglin run down some rap releases from the months of February and March in the latest What Would Meek Do?. The song itself delivers a Pump of staccato urgency, his limited diction used to serve-up an obvious fact (“whole game full of drug addicts”), but with a frank sense of authority. So what is ‘over there’ that Keef wishes to point out? The four Mira-produced songs here are instant Juice WRLD classics, summarizing the best of his debut while expanding its sound. Last year, Pusha T’s DAYTONA was one of a few albums he produced and released in back-to-back weeks. Otherwise, there’s relatively little in terms of a structuring principle here — just a rapper who never misuses a second of his recording time. Our Kicking the Canon pick for this month honors the 25th anniversary of Nas’s debut album, and his most seminal work. And, no, the ones on the internet aren't quite accurate. ” Much like his good friend Earl Sweatshirt (who has a production credit here on “All In,” which sounds like a lo-fi B-Side from last year’s. Finally, Juice’s ability to absorb and imitate pop culture is no better displayed than on “Syphilis,” where he progressively intones Tekashi 69, Ski Mask, XXXtentacion, Smokepurrp, Wifisfuneral, Famous Dex, and Madeintyo all over a Chief Keef-inspired drill instrumental. “You heard Cole on that song, he was tryna hate.”. (WWMD)’ featuring Kanye West. But the most exhilarating tracks on Harverd Dropout are cut solo: “Drop Out” weaves industrial beeps and silly ad libs into one pristine beat, letting Pump expound on just how much better his life got when he dropped out of Harvard (high-school). You may have heard of this one before: Illmatic. Nas recalls that he “Grew up in trife life, the times of white lines / The high pipes, murderous night times / And knife fights invite crimes” with such deft dexterity that you never once question his authenticity; this is the childhood, like thousands of black Americans, that he was born into, and the one that was expected to result in his death. ” A Tribe Called Quest’s Q-Tip supplies the childlike mbira of “One Love,” which rounds out the rougher tones of Nas’s voice as he lovingly writes to imprisoned companions, informing them of the outside world from which they’ve been cutoff. He’s a melodic rapper who completely blew up because of a Sting-plagiarized rap rant (“Lucid Dreams”) with an instrumental that proved a bigger earworm in 2018 than it did in 1993, displaying an undeniable knack for melody — a deadly skill when coupled with his formidable freestyle ability (see: interview with Tim Westwood). But where the tape really shines is in the moments when Zaytoven lets King Glo experiment: “Fast” repeatedly starts and stops its high-toned beat to build-up Sosa’s half-sung momentum, while “Han Han” features one of Keef’s most outlandish inflections, which serves as one of his most memorable choruses since the low-register chuckle of “Laughing to the Bank.” On “Spy Kid,” Keef casually whips-up melodies from the simplest of phrases, stretching out the word “there” with such an elongated croak that it practically becomes the hook of the track itself. It’s exciting to see such chemistry between a master and his student, but it also highlights Gunna’s biggest problem as an artist: he’s nothing much beyond a Young Thug imitator, one who’s rarely as exciting — and much easier to get a general read on after a quick listen. “You heard Cole on that song he was tryna hate.” pic.twitter.com/0UOz8HCE7F, — Troy from Community (@malcolmflexed) May 30, 2019. It is the copyrighted property of its respective owner(s). Clarence instantly screams, “Gucci Gang!” and a few of the boys laugh (good one, Clare Bear). The project's sole criticism was that the production was already so good, it could carry anyone. Share this: Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Related. ℗ 2018 GETTING OUT OUR DREAMS, INC./DEF JAM RECORDINGS, A DIVISION OF UMG RECORDINGS, INC. That side of Skies deserves expansion. Since being signed to G.O.O.D Music, T released Fear of God, Fear of God II: Let Us Pray, Wrath of Caine, and My Name Is My Name. “On a Mountain” features a lightly-strummed guitar melody that’s clearly aping, ’ aesthetic, and “Cash War” feels like a less-enthusiastic retread of “Stunna.” It seems Gunna has become a victim of his own success, where his ability to match the outlandish timbre of one of this generation’s most ingenious performers has also boxed him in, creatively. But where the tape really shines is in the moments when Zaytoven lets King Glo experiment: “Fast” repeatedly starts and stops its high-toned beat to build-up Sosa’s half-sung momentum, while “Han Han” features one of Keef’s most outlandish inflections, which serves as one of his most memorable choruses since the low-register chuckle of “Laughing to the Bank.” On “Spy Kid,” Keef casually whips-up melodies from the simplest of phrases, stretching out the word “, ” with such an elongated croak that it practically becomes the hook of the track itself.

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